Therapeutic Areas for Wearable Devices in Clinical Trials

Wearable devices are currently growing hugely in popularity, with predictions that the market will grow to $25 billion by 20191. Many of these devices, like the FitBit or Jawbone, are fairly cheap and affordable to the public. With the rising prevalence of chronic conditions like obesity due to our increasingly sedentary lifestyles, the use of wearable technology is on the up. Although initially marketed to consumers wanting to track their health and fitness, many wearable medical devices are now being designed and their potential use in clinical trials could completely transform and revolutionise the pharmaceutical industry. The obvious benefits to incorporating wearables in clinical trials are a higher compliance rate and reduced dropout rate, because wearing a device to monitor various vital signs and endpoints can reduce the need for hospital visits. For the same reason, clinical trials could have a much higher uptake and recruitment rate. The large amount of additional data could mean a lower variability, so fewer subjects could be needed to achieve statistical power.  However, this concept is virtually brand new and has major questions that need to be answered before real progress in this area can begin.